FORUM PARAMEDIK
Selamat melayari Forum Paramedik,

Dengan mendaftar keahlian di Forum Paramedik, anda akan mendapat lebih informasi dan juga boleh berkomunikasi dengan ahli-ahli forum yang lain.

meriahkan forum paramedik dengan mendaftar keahlian anda disini.

Terima Kasih.

BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Page 1 of 2 1, 2  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Miau! BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 10:10 am

Vowels in the korean languages may be attached to the left, right or beneath each other in order to form a word, the following are examples of their use : -


가 = ka 거 = keo 겨 = kyeo
갸 = kya 기 = ki 고 = ko

바 = pa 버 = peo 부 = pu
뵤 = pyo 지 = chi 저 = cheo
즈 = chu 조 = cho 마 = ma
머 = meo 무 = mo 나 = na
너 = neo 이 = i 야 = ya
디 = ti 고 = ko 댜 = tya
요 = yo 오 = o 도 = to
드 = tu 두 = too 그 = ku



When constructing a word, you must add a mixture of consonants and vowels, beginning with the consonant at the beginning of the word. In some cases, there is no need to use a consonant at the beginning in which case ㅇ (null character) is used.
ㅇ + ㅏ = 아 a
ㄹ + ㅡ + ㅁ = 름 rum
ㄱ + ㅏ + ㅁ = 감 kam
ㄲ + ㅜ + ㅇ = 꿍 kkoong
ㅇ + ㅗ + ㅅ = 옷 ot
ㅇ + ㅓ + ㅂㅅ = 없 eop
ㄲ + ㅗ + ㅊ = 꽃 kkot
ㅎ + ㅏ + ㄴ = 한 han
ㄱ + ㅡ + ㄱ = 극 guk

More on constructing words
A syllable that consists of a consonant and a "vertical vowel" is written with the consonant on the left and the vowel on the right
ㄴ + ㅏ = 나
n + a = na

A syllable that consists of a consonant and a "horizontal vowel" is written with the consonant on top and the vowel underneath:
ㅁ + ㅗ = 모
m + o = mo

If a syllable has a consonant, vowel, and consonant, the final consonant, called patch'im (meaning "supporting floor" in Korean) goes to the bottom -- or floor -- of that syllable.
ㅁ + ㅏ + ㄴ = 만
m + a + n = man

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 10:11 am

Korean Names

In general, Korean names consist of 3 syllables.
The first part is the Surname ( such as Kim, Lee and Pak ), it is the followed by a two-syllable first name. In Korean, the surname always comes first which is opposite of Western Names such as Doojin Pak instead of the Korean method of Pak Doojin.
When you are referring to someone who you know well, then you may be able to refer to them directly, such as using their first name. However when youare introduced to someone to whom you are not familiar with, or am meeting for the first time, then you would add -ssi to the end of the name. An example of this would be Doojin-ssi

Making Polite Sentences

With verb stems which end in vowels such a ka-, ha- and sa- , it is possible to make these into polite sentences by adding -yo to the end of the words, such as Kayo ( which means "to go", or "I go" or "he goes" ). Verbs in the polite style can be used as statements, questions, suggestions or commands, and may be further emphasised by the tone of your voice. For example, Chal Chinaessoyo may be both expressed as a question by asking how someone is, or can be a question stating that you are fine. Another example is the more common Annyong Haseyo.

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 10:14 am

Korean Sentence Structure and Word order
In Korean the structure of sentence differ to English sentences, for example the phrase Chal Chinaessooyo literally means "Well have you been getting on?" which is the opposite from English.
In general the structure of the Korean sentences is broken down as subject - object - verb
"Jon the ball kicked"


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


"To Go" in order to do sentences
There are a few words that you may add to the end of verb stems at the end of sentences, these include -yo which makes sentences polite, and -ro which means "in order to".
In some cases the verb stems may in effect end in consonants in which case -uro is utilised.
The order of the sentences for an example sentence of "in order to buy bread I am goin to the shops" is restructured as "bread buy-in order-to the shops go"
In Korean unlike English, the subject of the sentences is optional like "I", then the "in order section" is next, which is then followed by "the place you are going".

(In English) I go to the shops in-order -to buy bread
(in Korean) I (optional) bread buy - in-order to shops to go


The Konglish for this sentence in Korean would be na-do ppang sa-ro kayo (I-do bread buy-in order-to go).


* The construction can only be used in verbs involving 'going' and 'coming' and cannot be used with other verbs at the end of sentences.

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 10:56 am

There Are / There is
The Korean verb which means either "there are" and "there is" is issoyo ( )
They are dependent on the context in which you use them, and on what you are talking about. The stem of the verb is iss- with the inclusion of o and the polite particle -yo, thus forming the ending -oyo. However in the case where the verb stem ends in vowel, we use -a or -o, such as -ayo.
Vowel stem - yo
Consonant stem - ayo if the last vowel ends with -a or -o
Consonant Stem - oyo


In context the oppposite of iss- is ops- which literally means "there isnt" or "there arent".



Uses of the verbs
chogi issoyo means "it exist over there", or "its over there"
Issoyo on its own can mean "I have/he has"
Opsoyo means "I dont have" or "I havent got"



In a shop
When addressing a shop keeper or waiters, Koreans use ajossi literally meaning uncle, but is used as a general word when addressing someone in a shop.
However if it were to be used in a formal way, it is only for the referral of a man,
For females the word ajumma meaning aunt is used, for people over 35-ish, and for younger woman agassi is used for young women.

In Korean, we use a particle which comes after a noun that it relates to, such as na-do (me-too).
In English, it is the opposite, we would say 'with-me', whereas Korean is 'me-with'.


Using 'and'
In Korean, the word for and is -hago, this is a particle so when it is to be used it must be attached to a noun. For example, when you say 'burger and chips', in Korean it would be 'burger-hago chips. The word hago becomes part of burger.
The particle hago can also mean with such as, Doojin-hago shinae-e kayo meaning 'I am going to town with Doojin'.

Ordering with numbers
When asking for 'one' item we say 'hana' which is said after you have selected the meal you wish to order. For example we would say, soju hana chuseyo meaning "soju one give me please".
The word chuseyo utilises the polite word stem -yo, attached to chu-, which means "give me please"

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 10:58 am

In Korean, when you want to address men politely, one would use the word songsaegnim attached to their surname or full name, this literally means teacher.
For example, one would say Yoo Songsaegnim or with the full name Yoo SangHyun Songsaegnim.
It is not possible to a Korean persons first name, such like SangHyun Songsaegnim. For that same reason, when you use the ssi, you cannot say Yoo-ssi, or Yoo SangHyun-ssi, but would rather say SangHyun-ssi.

Addressing Korean women, in Korea women do not take their husbands surname when they get married.
For example if Mrs Han is married to Mr Kim, then she may referred to as Kim songsaengnim-puin (Kim mr-wife), or she maybe reffered to in a similar English terminology such as Misesu Han(Mrs Han).


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Using Copula to describe "this is that"
In Korean, if you want to describe A is B , you will have to use special verbs called copula. In Korea, this copula is present at the end of a sentence, and behaves a little differently to ordinary verbs.

If you want to say A is B(like "This is a Korean book"):-

A B-ieyo (or B-eyo)
this Korean book-ieyo

It is obvious that you would use -eyo when B ends in a vowel, but -ieyo when B ends on a consonant.

songsaengnim-ieyo (is teacher)
soju-eyo (is soju)

IMPORTANT to note that in Korean the copula is only used to describe when this "is equivalent to".
It cant be used to say "is located in"(is underneath", "is near") nor can it be used to say "is a certain way" (i.e "is red", "is happy").


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Describing how things are
Korean possess words which mean "is a certain way".
Ottaeyo means is how?, as in:
songsaengnim ottaeyo? ( How is teacher ? or What is teacher like? )
saob ottaeyo? (How is business? or What is business like?)

Kuraeyo literally means "it is like that", and may be used as a statement such as "it's like that", "thats right", "it is".
On the other hand it may be used as a question Kuraeyo? meaning "is it like that?", "really?" or "is that so?".
Korean has a special particle, used in attachment to place emphasis on what is being talked about.
by adding -un or nun, it makes As for Business or As for me.
-nun is attached to a noun, whereas -un is attached to a vowel. EG soju-nun (as for soju), Songsaengnim-un (as for teacher).

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 10:59 am

-hamnida and -jiman
In Korean, it is possible to add polite endings to verbs, for example, shillye hamnida (excuse me), which is comprised of the verb stem shille ha-, and the verb ending hamnida (note this is the formal style).
There is also the verb and stem, shillye-jiman (I'm sorry but....) which is a abbreviation of the verb and stem shillye ha-jiman , containing the ending -jiman which means but.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Asking a person
In Korean, there is a special verb which may be used in the event where you want to ask someone if they are someone.....for example "Are you Mr Han".
We would use -iseyo, and simply add this to the end of a phrase.
Han songsaengnim-iseyo? ( Are you Mr Han?)
Hangungmal songsaengnim-iseyo? (Are you the Korean Teacher?)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Subjects and topics of Korean sentences
In Korean, we attach -i to the end of nouns which end with consonants, or attach -ga to the end of nouns which end in a vowel. By doing this, it is possible to give emphasis, on subjects in sentences.
For example, songsaenim-i ( teacher ) or maekju-ga (beer) give emphasis on each of these subjects in a sentence.

For a sentence , "The man kissed the dog", the subject in this case would be The man.

On the other hand, when a subject is mentioned for the first time, the subject particle is used, but later on in a conversation, this is switched back to the topic particle.
The topic particle, is similar to that of the english "As for", and is best used in order to compare two things.
For example, as for me ( na-nun ), I love shopping
as for mum (ma-nun), she hates it.

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 11:00 am

Negative Copula
In Korean, when you are trying to say something is not something else, we use the negative copula anieyo. For instance, When saying 'A is not B', we would say :-

cho-nun songsaengnim-i anieyo ( I am not a teacher ).
hanguk hakkwa-ga anieyo ( Not the Korean department ).



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Answering questions with Yes and No in Korean
This is a tricky aspect of the Korean language, it is quite different to how we would speak in English.
For example: -
Question in English = "Do you like Korea ?"
Answer in English = "Yes I do like it" or "No i dont"
Answer in Korean = "No, I do like it" or "Yes i dont"

As you can see...it can be confusing at first, so you will need to think carefully.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Where is it?
When asking where something is in Korean, you would say (X-subject) odieyo?
However, it is also possible to say (X-subject) odi issoyo?

When answering a Where is question, you must always use issoyo as a verb such that:-
hakkyo-ga kogi issoyo ( the school is over there ).


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Using Korean sentences with but....
We have previously seen that shillye hamnida and the equivalent shillye-jiman mean "Excuse me,but" or "I'm Sorry, but...." .
There are lots of verbs where you may attach -jiman onto, here are a few of them:-
ka- ( go ) ka-jiman ( goes, but .......)
ha- ( do ) ha-jiman ( does,but......)
sa- ( buy ) sa-jiman ( buys,but.....)
iss- ( is/are, have ) it-jiman ( has,but....)
mashi- ( drink ) mashi-jiman ( drinks,but.....)
mok- ( eat ) mok-jiman ( eats, but.......)
anj- (sit ) anj-jiman ( sits, but.....)

Note that for the word iss-jiman the double ss is re-written to itjiman


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Using polite requests
In Korean, the word chom is used to mean "please", however do not mistake it to mean the same as the English word for please for all occurances. For instance, when you use chom in a request immediately before the verb at the end of the sentence, it takes on the effect of please.
It is most frequently using in relation to chu- when making requests, for example
Han songsaengnim chom pakkwo-juseyo( Can I speak to Mr Han ), or you might use it in Soju chom chuseyo ( Please give me the Soju ). As you can see, chom may be used to soften up requests by making it more polite.

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 11:01 am

In Korean there are two sets of numbers which are used when counting, the first set are known as pure Korean numbers, and the other are Sino-korean which is based on the chinese numerals.
The use of these numbers depends on the context in which it is used, for example the pure korean numbers are used when counting hours, and the sino korean when used to count minutes.

kong 0
il 1 shibil 11 ishibil 21
i 2 shibi 12 ishibi 22
sam 3 shipsam 13 ishipsam 23
sa 4 shipsa 14 ishipsa 24
o 5 shibo 15
yuk 6 shimnyuk 16
ch'il 7 shipch'il 17
p'al 8 shipp'al 18
ku 9 shibku 19 ishipku 29
ship 10 iship 20 samship 30

saship 40
kuship 90
paek 100
ch'on 1000
man 10,000

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 11:03 am

Making requests more polite
The polite honorific -seyo can be used to make requests more polite, -seyo is used when the verb stem ends in in a vowel, and -useyo is used when the verb stem ends in a consonant.

Examples of these are:-
mashi- becomes mashiseyo
ha- becomes haseyo
kidari- becomes kidariseyo
iss- becomes issuseyo
anj- becomes anjuseyo

If you want to request someone to wait for you, you would say kidariseyo (Please wait !!).
The use of -seyo means that you have a special respect for the person, for example if you say hansongsaengnim-i hakkyo-e kaseyo ,you are saying Mr Han is going to school. ( But you are also showing special respect for him ).


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



What you want to do ?
Koreans use -ko ship'oyo which literally means want to, and this can be added to a verb stem.
For example you may say, cho-nun mok-ko ship'oyo which means I want to eat, notice that when it is used, the -ko is utilised by being added to the end of the verb stem.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Making Suggestions
When making suggestions, Koreans use -(u)pshida ( literally means lets do), as you may have guessed, -pshida is attached onto verb stems ending in a vowel, and -upshida is attached to verbstems ending in a consonant.
Here are some examples:-
Umryosu mashipshida ( Lets have a drink )

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 11:43 am

Hello.
안녕하십니까. ( annyoung hashimnikka)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hello. (informal)
안녕. ( annyoung)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
How are you?
어떻게 지내십니까? (Eo-ddeo'ke ji naeshimnikka?)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fine, thank you.
잘 지냅니다, 감사합니다. (Jal jinaemnida )
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
What is your name?
당신의 이름은 무엇입니까? (dangshin-ui ireum-eun mu-eot-imnida?)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My name is ______ .
제 이름은 ______입니다. (Je ireum-eun ____ imnida.)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Nice to meet you.
만나서 반갑습니다. (Mannaseo pangapseumnida)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Please.
부탁합니다. (but'ak hamnida)

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 11:44 am

Thank you.
감사합니다. ( kamsa hamnida)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
You're welcome.
천만에요. (cheon maneyo )
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Yes.
예/네. ( ye/ne)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
No.
아니오. ( anio)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Excuse me. (getting attention)
실례합니다. (shille hamnida )
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Excuse me. (begging pardon)
죄송합니다. (juay song hamnida )
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I'm sorry.
죄송합니다. ( juay song hamnida)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Goodbye
안녕히 가십시오/계십시오. (annyeonghi kashipsio/kyeshipsio)

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 11:44 am

Goodbye (informal)
안녕. ( annyoung)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Is there someone here who speaks English?
여기에 영어를 하시는 분 계십니까? (yeogi-eh yong-eo reul hashineun bun kyeshimnikka?)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I can't speak {language} [well].
저는 {언어를} [잘] 못합니다. (seonin {oen-eo-reul} [sal] moshamnida)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Do you speak {language}?
{언어를} 하십니까? ({oen-eo-reul} hashimnikka?)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
English
영 어를 (yong eo-reul)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Korean
한국 어를 (hankuk eo-reul)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chinese
중국 어를 (chukuk eo-reul)

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 11:45 am

Japanese
일본 어를 (ilmon eo-reul)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Help!
도와주십시오! (Dowaju shipshio!)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Look out!
조심하십시오! (Jushimha shipshio!)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Good morning.
좋은 아침입니다. (Joh-eun ah-chim-imnida)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Good evening.
좋은 저녁입니다. (Joh-eun jeonyeok imnida)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Good night.
좋은 밤입니다. (joh-eun bamimnida)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Good night (to sleep)
안녕히 주무십시오. (annyeonghi jumushipshio)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I don't understand.
이해가 안갑니다. (ee-haega ankamnida)

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 11:46 am

Where is the toilet?
화장실이 어디에 있습니까? (hwajangshilee eodi-eh it-seumnida?)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Problem

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 11:48 am

Leave me alone.
혼자 내버려 두십시오. (honja naebeoryeo dushipshio.)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Don't touch me!
만지지 마십시오! (manjiji mashipshio!)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I'll call the police.
경찰을 부르겠습니다. (Kyeongchal-eul bureuket-seumnida!)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Police!
경찰! (Kyeongchal!)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Stop! Thief!
서라! 도둑이야! (Seora! Dodookiya!)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I need your help.
당신의 도움이 필요합니다. (Dangshin-eun do-oomee p'ilyohamnida.)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
It's an emergency.
응급 상황입니다. (eungkeup sanghwangimnida.)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I'm lost.
길을 잃었습니다. (kil-eul ilheot-seumnida.)

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 11:49 am

I lost my bag.
가방을 잃었습니다. (kabangeul ilhyeotseumnida.)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I lost my wallet.
지갑을 잃었습니다. (jakapeul ilhyeotseumnida.)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I'm sick.
아픕니다. (ah-peumnida.)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I've been injured.
상처를 입었습니다. (sangcheoreul ipeotseumnida.)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I need a doctor.
의사가 필요합니다. (ui-saga p'ilyohamnida.)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Can I use your phone?
당신의 전화기를 사용해도 되겠습니까? (dangshin-ui jeolhwagireul sayonghaedo dwiket-seumnikka?)

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Numbers

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 11:55 am

Korean has two sets of numbers, namely native Korean numbers and Sino-Korean numbers (which are borrowed from Chinese). Both come in handy, but in a pinch the Sino-Korean series is more important to learn.

Sino-Korean Numbers
Sino-Korean numbers are used for amounts of currency, telephone numbers, the 24-hour clock and counting minutes. Remember that sip is pronounced "ship".


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


0
공 (gong)

1
일 (il)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2
이 (i)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3
삼 (sam)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
4
사 (sa)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
5
오 (o)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
6
육 (yuk)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
7
칠 (chil)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
8
팔 (pal)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
9
구 (gu)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
10
십 (sip)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
11
십일 (sipil)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
12
십이 (sipee)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
13
십삼 (sipsam)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
14
십사 (sipsa)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
15
십오 (sipo)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
16
십육 (sipyuk)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
17
십칠 (sipchil)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
18
십팔 (sippal)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
19
십구 (sipgu)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
20
이십 (isip)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
21
이십일 (isipil)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
22
이십이 (isipi)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
23
이십삼 (isipsam)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
30
삼십 (samsip)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
40
사십 (sasip)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
50
오십 (osip)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
60
육십 (yuksip)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
70
칠십 (chilsip)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
80
팔십 (palsip)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
90
구십 (gusip)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
100
백 (baek)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
200
이백 (ibaek)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
300
삼백 (sambaek)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1000
천 (cheon)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2000
이천 (icheon)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
10000
만 (man)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1,000,000
백만 (baekman)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1,000,000,000
십억 (sipeok)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1,000,000,000,000
조 (jo)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
number _____ (train, bus, etc.)
_____ 번 (열차, 버스, etc.) (beon (yeolcha, beoseu, etc.)

half
반 (ban)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
less
덜 (deol)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
more
더 (deo)

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Native Korean Numbers

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 11:57 am

Native Korean numbers are used for hours and with counting words. There are a plethora of these, but the most useful ones are bun (분) for people, jang (장) for papers including tickets, and gae (개) for pretty much anything else (which is not always strictly correct, but will usually be understood). Note that for numbers 1,2,3,4,and 20 + 'counting words',the last letter is dropped: one person is hanbun, two tickets is tujang , three things is segae, four things is negae, twenty things is seumugae.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


1
하나 (hana)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2
둘 (tul)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3
셋 (set)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
4
넷 (net)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
5
다섯 (taseot)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
6
여섯 (yeoseot)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
7
일곱 (ilgop)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
8
여덟 (yeodeol)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
9
아홉 (ahop)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
10
열 (yeol)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
11
열하나 (yeolhana)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
20
스물 (seumul)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
30
서른 (seoreun)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
40
마흔 (maheun)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
50
쉰 (swin)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
60
예순 (yesun)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
70
일흔 (ilheun)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
80
여든 (yeodeun)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
90
아흔 (aheun)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Numbers above 100 are always counted with Sino-Korean numbers.

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Time

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 12:02 pm

now
지금 (jigeum)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
later
나중에 (najoong-eh)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
before
전에 (jeon-eh)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
morning
아침 (ah-chim)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
afternoon
오후 (o-hu)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
evening
저녁 (jeonyeok)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
night
밤 (bam)

Clock
one o'clock AM
오전 한 시 (ohjyeon han shi)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
two o'clock AM
오전 두 시 (ohjyeon du shi)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
noon
정오 (jeong-oh)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
one o'clock PM
오후 한 시 (o-hu han shi)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
two o'clock PM
오후 두 시 (o-hu du shi)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
midnight
자정 (jajeong)

Duration
_____ minute(s)
_____ 분 (___ boon)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
_____ hour(s)
_____ 시간 (___ shigan)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
_____ day(s)
_____ 일 (___ il)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
_____ week(s)
_____ 주 (___ ju)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
_____ month(s)
_____ 달 (___ dal)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
_____ year(s)
_____ 년 (___ nyon)

Days
today
오늘 (oh-neul)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
yesterday
어제 (eo-jeh)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
tomorrow
내일 (nae-il)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
this week
이번 주 (ee-beon ju)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
last week
지난 주 (jeenan ju)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
next week
다음 주 (da-eum ju)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sunday
일요일 (ilyo-il)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Monday
월요일 (weolyo-il)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tuesday
화요일 (hwayo-il)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wednesday
수요일 (suyo-il)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Thursday
목요일 (mokyo-il)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Friday
금요일 (keumyo-il)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Saturday
토요일 (t'oh-yo-il)

Months
January
일월 (ilweol)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February
이월 (ee-weol)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March
삼월 (samweol)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April
사월 (saweol)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May
오월 (oh-weol)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June
육월 (yook-weol)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July
칠월 (chilweol)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
August
팔월 (palweol)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September
구월 (goo-weol)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
October
십월 (shipweol)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November
십일월 (shipilweol)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December
십이월 (ship-ee-weol)

Writing
12-24-2005 is in Korean the same as in English (12-24-2005).


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


January 1st, 2005
이천오년 일월 일일 (ee-cheol-oh-nyeon ilweol il-il)(____year, _____month, ____day)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
January 2nd
일월 이일 (ilweol ee-il.)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
January 3rd
일월 삼일 (ilweol samil)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
January 10th
일월 십일 (ilweol shipil)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
January 11th
일월 십일일 (ilweol shipil-il)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
January 20th
일월 이십일 (ilweol ee-shipil)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
January 30th
일월 삼십일 (ilweol samshipil)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
January 31th
일월 삼십일일 (ilweol samshipil-il)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 1st
이월 일일 (iweol il-il)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 25th
십이월 이십오일 (ship-ee-weol ee-ship-oh-il)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 31th
십이월 삼십일일 (ship-ee-weol samshipil-il)

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! colour

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 12:05 pm

black
검은색 (geon-eunsaek)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
white
흰색 (hwinsaek)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
gray
회색 (hwasaek)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
red
빨간색 (bbalgansaek)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
blue
파란색 (p'aransaek)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
yellow
노란색 (noransaek)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
green
초록색 (choroksaek)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
orange
주황색 (joo-hwangsaek)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
purple
자주색 (jajoo-saek)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
brown
갈색 (kalsaek)

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! diphthongs

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 12:09 pm

Korean has two standalone diphthongs:

oe ㅚ
like 'whe' in "when"


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ui ㅢ
like 'u' + 'i'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In addition, most vowels can be modified by prefixing them with 'y' or 'w':

wa ㅘ
wae ㅙ
wo ㅝ
wi ㅟ
we ㅞ
ya ㅑ
yo ㅛ
yeo (yŏ) ㅕ
yu ㅠ

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! consonant

Post by sweetcouple on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 12:12 pm

Most Korean consonants come in three versions, namely unaspirated (without a puff of air), aspirated (with a puff of air) and tensed (stressed). Unaspirated consonants exist in English too, but never alone: compare the sound of 'p' in "pot" (aspirated) and "spot" (unaspirated). Many English speakers find it helpful to pronounce an imperceptible little "m" in front to 'stop' the puff. Tensing isn't really found in English, but pronouncing the consonant quick and hard is a reasonable substitute.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


b (p) ㅂ
like 'p' in "spit" (unaspirated)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
p (p'/ph) ㅍ
like 'p' in "pig" (aspirated)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
pp ㅃ
tensed 'p'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
m ㅁ
like 'm' in "mother"
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
d (t) ㄷ
like 't' in "stab"
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
t (t'/ph) ㅌ
like 't' in "top"
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
tt ㄸ
tensed 't'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
n ㄴ
like 'n' in "nice"
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
j (ch) ㅈ
like 'g' in "gin"
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
jj ㅉ
tensed 'j'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ch (ch') ㅊ
like 'ch' in "chin"
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
g (k) ㄱ
like 'k' in "skate" (unaspirated)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
k (k'/kh) ㅋ
like 'c' in "cat" (aspirated)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
kk ㄲ
tensed 'k'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ng o
like 'ng' in "sing"
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
s ㅅ
like 'ss' in "hiss", but si is pronounced like 'shi' in 'ship'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ss ㅆ
tensed 's'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
l ㄹ
somewhere between 'l', 'r' and 'n'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
h ㅎ
like 'h' in "help"
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


While the rules above are usually correct for the first consonant, those in the middle of a word are usually (but not always) voiced, which means that ㅂㄷㅈㄱ turn into English "b", "d", "j" and "k". The best rule of thumb is to concentrate on remembering that the first consonant is "special" and the rest are more or less as in English: bibimbap (비빔밥) is pronounced "pee-bim-bap", not "bee-bim-bap" or "phee-bim-bap".
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The aspirated spellings with "h" are used only in the official North Korean orthography.

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by nonejoke on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 2:56 pm

u ni rajin sangat la sweet. caiyok caiyok (tu kira korean tak)

nonejoke
AHLI SENIOR
AHLI SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : apa apa la
Gender : Male
Jumlah Post : 98
Umur : 36
Tarikh Register : 26/06/2009
Reputation : 12
Points : 2634

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by fasha_wanna on Sun 26 Jul 2009, 6:38 pm

bykkk nyee..

----Forum Paramedik Malaysia-----




-GiGi wAriSAn KitA.. BeRSamA KitA MeNjaGA- Very Happy

fasha_wanna
STAFF PEMUDAH CARA
STAFF PEMUDAH CARA

Negeri :
Jawatan : part tym rempit n car race :P
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 2764
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 06/01/2008
Reputation : 36
Points : 6042

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: ~~we can never change our past but we can always choose our future..~~

View user profile http://profiles.friendster.com

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by sweetcouple on Mon 27 Jul 2009, 6:20 pm

@nonejoke wrote:u ni rajin sangat la sweet. caiyok caiyok (tu kira korean tak)

caiyok..caiyok tu sebenarnya jia you..jia you.. ayat tu dalam bahasa mandarin..

jomlah sama2 belajar korea dgn sweet..sweet pun ngah belajar skali ni..

sweetcouple
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR
KERABAT TEGAR SENIOR

Negeri :
Jawatan : penyelidik
Gender : Female
Jumlah Post : 1147
Umur : 29
Tarikh Register : 24/06/2009
Reputation : 17
Points : 3866

Character sheet
Mutiara Kata saya: there's only one in my life..only you.

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Miau! Re: BAHASA KOREA : Mari Belajar Bahasa Korea - Speak Korean...Let's Join..

Post by Sponsored content Today at 4:05 pm


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 1 of 2 1, 2  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum